A mad world: capitalism and the rise of mental illness

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Sectioned - mental healthsource: Red Pepper
published: 9 August 2017 

Mental illness is now recognised as one of the biggest causes of individual distress and misery in our societies and cities, comparable to poverty and unemployment. One in four adults in the UK today has been diagnosed with a mental illness, and four million people take antidepressants every year.

‘What greater indictment of a system could there be,’ George Monbiot has asked, ‘than an epidemic of mental illness?’

The shocking extent of this ‘epidemic’ is made all the more disturbing by the knowledge that so much of it is preventable. This is due to the significant correlation between social and environmental conditions and the prevalence of mental disorders. Continue reading

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Lankelly Chase commissions new national centre of excellence

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Lankelly Synergi Logosource: Lankelly Chase Foundation 
published: 5 July 2017 

Lankelly Chase Foundation has commissioned Queen Mary University of London, the University of Manchester and Words of Colour Productions to establish an independent centre of excellence on ethnic inequalities, severe mental illness and multiple disadvantage.

With a strategic award of £1,245,000, the Synergi Collaborative Centre will deliver a five-year national programme, focused on working towards the transformation of health services for ethnic minority people with severe mental illness.

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PM to look at ‘institutional racism’ of black people by mental health services

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Young Peoplesource: Care Appointments
published: 1 March 2017

Prime Minister Theresa May said she is “looking at” the treatment of black people by mental health services amid claims of “institutional racism”.

Labour MP Steve Reed said young black men using mental health services were more likely to be subject to detention and “severe” physical restraint, as he called for an inquiry.

The Croydon North MP cited the example of constituent Olaseni Lewis, who died after he was restrained in a south-east London psychiatric hospital in August 2010.

Speaking at Prime Minister’s Questions, Mrs May agreed the issue was a problem. Continue reading