White nationalists are flocking to genetic ancestry tests, and they’re not liking what they find

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Undercover Man Hidingsource: Alternet 
published: 17 August 2017 

It was a strange moment of triumph against racism: The gun-slinging white supremacist Craig Cobb, dressed up for daytime TV in a dark suit and red tie, hearing that his DNA testing revealed his ancestry to be only “86 percent European, and … 14 percent Sub-Saharan African.” The studio audience whooped and laughed and cheered.

And Cobb – who was, in 2013, charged with terrorizing people while trying to create an all-white enclave in North Dakota – reacted like a sore loser in the schoolyard.

“Wait a minute, wait a minute, hold on, just wait a minute,” he said, trying to put on an all-knowing smile. “This is called statistical noise.” Continue reading

De Governors Greed : Brexit; fooled by the fools

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Parliament Big Ben from Westminster Bridge - Image Credit Free Range Stock - Jack MorehAlmost 20 years ago, as a performance poet using traditional Caribbean pros, I wrote, performed and recorded one of my trademark poems, De Governors Greed. Friends and family told me then that the poem would remain poignantly relevant for years to come.

I have speckled this article with phrases from the poem.

With the recent car crash of the United Kingdom’s Brexit from the European Union (EU) this poem has once again come alive for me, particularly since some of the aftershocks of Brexit are now being heard and felt all over the country and even beyond it.

The keynote ‘rant’ of the piece was “The governor can’t fool me” evoking a principled approach I have adopted throughout all of my adult life, that I would never allow myself to become a mental puppet of the so-called established state whatever form it took. Continue reading

Round up of voluntary sector reaction to the EU referendum result

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SurveyThe charity chief executives body Acevo has called for a summit to discuss the estimated £200m a year of European Union funding the sector will lose, and the chief executive of the National Council for Voluntary Organisations has urged charities to play a key role in rebuilding trust in society after the UK voted to leave the EU.

Other reactions from the voluntary sector to the result of yesterday’s referendum, in which 52 per cent of voters chose to leave the EU, included a warning from Paul Palmer, professor of voluntary sector management at Cass Business School, that there would be a “double whammy” of a fall in donations and further government austerity measures.

Martin Sime, chief executive of the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations, said the decision was a “seismic shock to our politics and economy that will have a profound effect”.

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